Monday, May 18, 2015

Summer Reading Program!

Pipestone County Star 05-28-2015

It’s that time of year again!! Kids and parents have already started asking when the Summer Reading program will start and it kills me we have to wait until June.  This year’s theme is Superheroes and we are so excited!  We’ve got some great activities planned for our activity days – see below!

If you are interested in being a volunteer for Summer Reading (and we need a bunch!), please let us know – we need people for each activity day from 1:30 until 3:30, which includes set up and clean up.  Thanks for thinking about it!

June 2nd: Today is the kick-off party!  Come in to sign up and we will have cupcakes and juice to whet those super appetites.  Kids are welcome to dress up and will be making their superhero ID tags.

June 9th: Have you ever needed practice with web-spinning? Perhaps throwing your super-powered trident? Today is the day to practice.  Rumor has it there will also be bowling for villains and a ‘laser’ maze in the library – time to train your super powers!

June 16th: Need a side kick? We are creating paper heroes today – complete with awesome capes!

June 23rd: Paper shields and hero bead bracelets are on the docket for today – great compliments to super costumes.

June 30th:  We will have a scavenger hunt in the library today and creating the paper skyline of the city you are sworn to defend.  Take the skyline home to decorate your lair.

July 7th:  Today is a day to make other heroes – we will have a melting bead hero craft (really very cool!!) and we will show you how to create your own heroes out of puzzle pieces.  Just what you might need if you were a villain – a way to create an army. Muahahahahaha!

July 14th:  Every hero needs a signal that can be given when they are needed and today will be the day to create the signal we would use to call upon you in our hour of need.  And we’ll also have jet races, because what self-respecting hero doesn’t like to race jets?

The activities end on July 14th, but the kids can continue to read books and get prizes through the end of August.  Middle Readers (Ages 5 -12) need to read 15 picture books or 100 pages of a chapter book to get a prize for a limit of three prizes over the course of the summer.  We also have reading logs for younger kids and teens if they are interested!

PAFL Update:  Pipestone Area Friends of the Library is looking for members – anyone who is a friend to Meinders Library is welcome to join!  The Friends group works hard to promote the library, raise money for projects, and organize their yearly book sale, in addition to the HUGE amount of support they provide throughout the year.  Call us for the date of the next meeting!


If you have questions or have a book you’d like to reserve or renew, please don’t hesitate to give us a call at (507) 825-6714.  The summer hours for Meinders Library are Monday through Thursday from 10 AM – 8 PM, and Friday from 10 AM – 5 PM, and Saturday from 10 AM – Noon.  Meinders Community Library is located at 1401 7th Street SW, on the south side of the high school.

Monday, April 20, 2015

Spring Into Reading!

Pipestone County Star – 04-30-2015

Spring is in the air! Tulips and irises are peeking out of the dirt, birds are happy again, the grass is getting green, and it’s time to sit on the deck with a drink and read a book, catching up on the vitamin D we missed over the long winter.  Here are a few books coming in May that will have you looking forward to those periods of downtime!!

“14th Deadly Sin,” James Patterson (4)
The next installment in the Women’s Murder Club promises to be even more engaging than the first thirteen.  Called to the scene of a brutal daylight murder, Lindsay Boxer uncovers video evidence of another terrible crime, one in which the perpetrators wear masks and could be just about anyone. Can the club solve the crime before they’re the next targets?

“The Forgotten Room,” Lincoln Child (5)
Jeremy Logan (from “Third Gate” and “Deep Storm”) is back in this third installment.  Logan is hired by a high profile think tank to discover why one of their premier scientists went mad, attacking an assistant and then killing himself more gruesomely.  Logan’s investigation at the seaside manor which houses the group uncovers a secret room filled with the evidence of a project long thought forgotten.  Or was it?

“Solitude Creek,” Jeffrey Deaver (12)
The fourth book of Kathryn Dance begins with someone yelling ‘fire’ in a crowded night club.  But he goes farther than that, locking the doors so no one can get out.  Even worse? There’s no fire, but several people die from the panic.  So what kind of murderer plans out something like that, then plans out more? Dance will have to find out.

“Dry Bones,” Craig Johnson (12)
Walt Longmire (#12) has another mystery on his hands.  The largest complete Tyrannosaurus ever discovered has been found in his jurisdiction and for a day or so, it seems great.  Then the rancher on whose land the bones were found dies under mysterious circumstances and Walt needs to figure out who would benefit most from that death

“Ming Tea Murder,” Laura Childs (15)
Teashop Mysteries #16 begins with a museum gala, celebrating an authentic Chinese tea house display.  The evening would not be complete without a dancing Chinese dragon, drums, violins, and a photo booth for commemoration. But Theodosia finds a body in the booth, one of the museums largest donors, and her boyfriend is suddenly a suspect.  Can she figure it out before it’s time for tea?

“Day Shift,” Charlaine Harris (15)
This is the second novel set in Midnight, Texas, a town where all of the residents keep to themselves.  Psychic Manuel gets into hot water when he sees another resident, Olivia, in Dallas with a couple who is found dead the next day.  And to top it off, one of his clients dies during a reading.  As he hightails it back to Midnight, hounded by the press, he gets the feeling that maybe that very same Olivia can help him fix the problem.  He may be right, he may be very wrong.

“Kickback,” Robert B Parker (19)
This is #43 in the Spenser series. Spenser is called in to investigate when a teenager is sent to prison for creating a Twitter account for his vice principal, as a joke.  Not a jailing offence, it would seem, but that’s what happens.  And it’s not just one teenager – many more kids are being sent to juvenile detention facilities for what seems like minor offences.  So what exactly is going on? The trail will take Spenser to the underbelly of Boston and a scandal in the world of for-profit detention.

Enjoy your spring reading!!

Upcoming Events: PAFL Annual Meeting with be May 16th at 2:00 PM at the library.  Faith Sullivan will be attending to talk about her books and there will be pie and ice cream.  We will have a great time, so hope you can join us!!

PAFL Update:  Pipestone Area Friends of the Library is looking for members – anyone who is a friend to Meinders Library is welcome to join!  The Friends group works hard to promote the library, raise money for projects, and organize their yearly book sale, in addition to the HUGE amount of support they provide throughout the year.  Call us for the date of the next meeting!


If you have questions or have a book you’d like to reserve or renew, please don’t hesitate to give us a call at (507) 825-6714.  The hours for Meinders Library are Monday through Thursday from 10 AM – 8 PM, and Friday and Saturday from 10 AM – 5 PM.  Meinders Community Library is located at 1401 7th Street SW, on the south side of the high school.

Monday, March 30, 2015

National Library Week

Pipestone County Star – 04-09-2015

I know, it seems as if there is a week for everything nowadays.  In April alone we have National Window Safety Week, National Public Health Week, National Oral, Head, and Neck Cancer Week, Administrative Professionals Week, and National Playground Safety Week.  And that’s not including any overlaps, where a week is used for awareness for more than one cause.  Of all the months of the year, May has the most, followed by October.  One small bit of useless knowledge for you (never know when you might be on Jeopardy) – the month of May has 31 different causes associated with it and each week is spoken for by at least three different National Awarenesses. 

And, of course, April is the month for National Library Week, celebrated this year from April 12 until April 19th

The first National Library Week was celebrated from May 16-22, 1958.  It was sponsored by both the American Library Association and the American Book Publishers Council.  It wasn’t a new idea by any means.  The state of Indiana had a Library Week from April 23 – 29, 1922 and at that time ALA recommended that a National Library Week be instituted in 1923.  Missouri, Ohio, Hawaii, California, and Louisiana had all been celebrating a Library Week of some sort long before it became recognized nationally.  In 1974, the American Library Association took over as the sole sponsor. 

It’s a great week to celebrate your local library and this year, we’ve decided to give everyone a bit of a break! If you bring back overdue materials during that week, there will be no fines!  Instead, we are asking people to bring non-expired, non-perishable food items for donation to the food bank in place of money.
                             
So, for example, if you have four overdue items and $15 in fines, you can bring back your items and three cans of food and you’ll be good to go!  We are requesting one food item per $5 in fines.  If you have outstanding fines (but have already returned the materials), you can bring in food during this week to have those fines forgiven with the same value – one food item per $5 in fines.

It’s also a great time for us to refresh your memory about the services the library offers. We have public computers with printing services (10 cents for black and white, 15 cents for color), free wireless internet, graphic novels, cake pans, audio books, music CDs (even new releases), story time on Wednesday and Thursday at 10:30, DVD new releases, and lots of books!!

Have a great week – we hope to see you at the library.

Upcoming Events: Mark your calendars! Joel Karstens will be coming to Meinders Library April 22 at 5:00 PM to talk about Straw Bale Gardening!  Joel has been doing this presentation for years and is an expert in straw bale gardening, so come and enjoy the instruction – learn how to garden anywhere with fewer weeds and no dirt needed!  We’ll see you there.

PAFL Update:  Pipestone Area Friends of the Library is looking for members – anyone who is a friend to Meinders Library is welcome to join!  The Friends group works hard to promote the library, raise money for projects, and organize their yearly book sale, in addition to the HUGE amount of support they provide throughout the year.  Call us for the date of the next meeting!


If you have questions or have a book you’d like to reserve or renew, please don’t hesitate to give us a call at (507) 825-6714.  The hours for Meinders Library are Monday through Thursday from 10 AM – 8 PM, and Friday and Saturday from 10 AM – 5 PM.  Meinders Community Library is located at 1401 7th Street SW, on the south side of the high school.

Wednesday, March 25, 2015

National Library Week, April 12-19 2015

National Library Week is April 12 – 19, 2015!  It’s a great week to celebrate your local library and we’ve decided to give everyone a bit of a break! If you bring back overdue materials during that week, there will be no fines!  Instead, we are asking people to bring non-expired, non-perishable food items for donation to the food bank in place of money.
                             
So, for example, if you have four overdue items and $15 in fines, you can bring back your items and three cans of food and you’ll be good to go!  We are requesting one food item per $5 in fines. 

If you have outstanding fines (but have already returned the materials), you can bring in food during this week to have those fines forgiven with the same value – one food item per $5 in fines.

Not only would we like to see our materials again, we would also like to get as many patrons as possible back in good standing, so we hope you can take advantage of this fine-free week!  Please keep in mind, this is only good during library hours between April 12 and 19.  You need to return your materials to a librarian in order to get your fines forgiven.

Have a great April!


If you have questions or have a book you’d like to reserve or renew, please don’t hesitate to give us a call at (507) 825-6714.  The hours for Meinders Library are Monday through Thursday from 10 AM – 8 PM, and Friday and Saturday from 10 AM – 5 PM.  Meinders Community Library is located at 1401 7th Street SW, on the south side of the high school.

Straw Bale Gardening April 22, 2015 5:00 PM

Meinders Library is very excited to welcome Joel Karsten for Straw Bale Gardening on April 22nd at 5:00 in celebration of Earth Day!!

Straw Bale Gardens – Breaking New Ground!  Grow a garden without pulling weeds, without the heavy lifting and without getting down on your hands and knees like traditional gardening requires.  If you thought the only place to grow healthy vegetable crops was in black dirt, you’ll be inspired by the science and biology Karsten offers in his presentation.  Learn to grow a bountiful garden using no herbicides, insecticides or pesticides.  Learn to plant a wide variety of vegetables, root crops, vine crops, and even beautiful flowers, directly into your “conditioned” straw bales, much earlier in the season than you’re used to.  Discover how any backyard, concrete patio, rooftop or driveway can become a productive garden.  Learn the details of this revolutionary and easy gardening method to create a beautiful and productive garden, without lifting a shovel and without using soil.

Come to the library and learn the fundamental skills needed to create your own straw bale garden!  Just two bales of straw can produce 240 tomatoes, ten heads of garlic, six quarts of basil, three quarts of thyme, and costs less than $20! 

JOEL KARSTEN, a farm boy who grew up tending a soil garden like other gardeners have for centuries, shook up the gardening world with his first book describing his breakthrough Straw Bale Gardening concept.  The New York Times called Straw Bale Gardening “a revolutionary gardening method” and his ideas have been enthusiastically embraced globally, making his books best-sellers in many languages.  Karsten earned a BS in Horticulture from the University of Minnesota and spends his summers tending his vegetable garden, doing research, and experimenting with new ideas and methods he can pass along to his followers.  He is a popular speaker, making appearances around the world at events that celebrate innovation, garden enthusiasts and healthy lifestyles. He is renowned for his social media presence, his popular blog, and millions of on-line impressions.  Karsten has inspired tens of thousands of first-time gardeners and a legion of “seasoned” growers who have found a new and better way to pursue their passion.  His methods have enabled “retired” gardeners to begin gardening again since his method eliminates the physical challenges found in traditional soil gardening.  Discover more information about Karsten and his revolutionary methods at www.StrawBaleGardens.com.  Links to his Blog, Newsletter, Facebook page, YouTube Channel, Twitter feed and Google Plus pages can all be found on his website.


If you have questions or have a book you’d like to reserve or renew, please don’t hesitate to give us a call at (507) 825-6714.  The hours for Meinders Library are Monday through Thursday from 10 AM – 8 PM, and Friday and Saturday from 10 AM – 5 PM.  Meinders Community Library is located at 1401 7th Street SW, on the south side of the high school.

Thursday, February 19, 2015

Where Is That Book?


Pipestone County Star  - 02-26-2015

So there’s a particular non-fiction book you want to find and coming to the library seems so overwhelming.  There are a LOT of books in non-fiction and they’re not organized in alphabetical order.  Turns out, there’s three choices for libraries to select from when shelving the non-fiction collection: the Dewey Decimal system, the Library of Congress system, and BISAC, which is mainly used in retail.

Dewey Decimal System:
This is how Meinders Library organizes their non-fiction.  The Dewey Decimal System is relatively easy to understand, but not completely logical.  It uses numbers from 001 to 999, with up to four decimal places (so 001.0001 to 999.9999).  001 starts off with computers and the internet, and 990 is the section for the History of Other Regions, namely Australia.  We have basic guides that we would be happy to give any patron who asked and all our endcaps are marked with the numbers corresponding to those shelves.  The more you use it, the more numbers you can remember: 921 is biography, 811 is poetry, 636.1 is horse books, etc.

Library of Congress:
Government entities and many academic libraries use the system developed by the Library of Congress.  The system relies on using most of the letters of the alphabet to designate basic subject areas.  Within each of those subject areas are sub-categories indicated by another letter, then a series of numbers to place that book in its exact location. SB423.T46 1965 is a book titled Goldfish Pools, Water-lilies, and Tropical Fishes.  S = Agriculture, B=Plant Culture, 423 indicates the class of plants.  If you search the Library of Congress catalogue, anything that begins SB423 is about ponds and their foliage.  T46 places the book into order with all the other books in that category (extremely confusing – check out Wikipedia “Library of Congress Classification” for an entire list of their subject headings).

BISAC:
Do you find it easy to search for a book at Barnes and Noble?  They use BISAC for their organization.   BISAC stands for Book Industry Standards and Communication.   There are fifty categories for non-fiction, ranging from Antiques and Collectibles to True Crime.  There are sections for drama, poetry, pets, education, self-help, etc.   Within each of those categories, books are arranged alphabetically by author.  Rather than having numbers on the spine, they have a listed section.

Some libraries have already done away with the top two methods of organization in favor of BISAC, including another joint-use (city, county, and school) library in Maricopa County, Arizona and the McMillan Memorial Library in Wisconsin.

As much as I love the idea of BISAC, Plum Creek requires that we use the Dewey Decimal system in our library.  Do you think it’s easier or harder to find books that way?  Feel free to weigh in on Facebook or Twitter using #bisacvsdewey. 

NOTE: If this article looks familiar, you might have read it before.  The majority of this article was published 05-24-2012 in the Pipestone County Star. As Stephanie is recovering from knee surgery, she is recycling a few articles for the month of March.  She begs forgiveness.

Winter Weather:  We tend to follow the lead of Pipestone Area Schools.  If the school is closed, we will also be closed.  If the school closes early, we stay open for about a half hour afterwards to make sure all the kids can get picked up.  If the school has a two hour late start, we are not affected and will open at our regular time of 10 AM.


PAFL Update:  Pipestone Area Friends of the Library is looking for members – anyone who is a friend to Meinders Library is welcome to join!  The Friends group works hard to promote the library, raise money for projects, and organize their yearly book sale, in addition to the HUGE amount of support they provide throughout the year.  Call us for the date of the next meeting!

If you have questions or have a book you’d like to reserve or renew, please don’t hesitate to give us a call at (507) 825-6714.  The summer hours for Meinders Library are Monday through Thursday from 10 AM – 8 PM, Friday from 10 AM – 5 PM, and Saturday from 10AM to Noon.  Meinders Community Library is located at 1401 7th Street SW, on the south side of the high school.



That Darned Dewey


Pipestone County Star – 03-12-2015

To continue the article from last week about the various ways to organize non-fiction, here is a handy guide to searching for books in the Dewey Decimal System.

Dewey Decimal uses a series of numbers from 0 -999.99 to organize books into similar subjects.  Inside the number values, the books are organized by author’s last name.

000 – 099.99 Information: At the beginning of the numbers, you will find books on computers, library science, books of facts (Guinness World Record books are very popular here!) , journalism and the media, quotation books, and any rare books.  We don’t have rare books and manuscripts at the Pipestone Library, but other libraries in bigger communities might have some.

100 – 199.99 Philosophy and Psychology: These numbers contain philosophy, metaphysics, astrology and the occult, psychology, logic, and ethics – all the things for light summer reading, right?  I know, I know…very few people actually want anything out of this section, but some of the material in there is really fun.

200 – 299.99 Religion: Here we get a little more interesting.  Religion, religious theory, Bibles (found in the 220s), the history and organization of the Christian church, and all other religious denominations can be found in these numbers.  Spiritual counseling also falls into this area, as well as the other holy books from other religions.

300 – 399.99 Social Sciences: Anthropology (my major in college) is found here, as well as statistics, political science, economics, law, public administration and military science, education, commerce, etiquette, and folklore.  Some great stuff if you enjoy thinking while you read (sometimes I do, sometimes I don’t!).

400 – 499.99 Language: Language and linguistics make up the 400s.  English and Old English, German, French, Italian, Spanish, Latin, and many others are found in this section, both learning to speak those languages and books written in those languages.

500 – 599.99 Science:  Just what you were waiting for, right?? Science, mathematics, astronomy, physics, chemistry, astronomy, geology, fossils (DINOSAURS!!) biology, plants, and animals are all found in this area.  Kids LOVE these books, especially the dinosaurs and animals.  Plant and bird lovers are BOUND to find something that excites them, as well as gardeners.

600 – 699.99 Technology: Medical science, technology, engineering, agriculture, home and family management, business, chemical engineering, and building and construction are found here.  If you have a remodeling project or are keen on reorganizing your home, this is the place for you.  Cookbooks are also found here (641.5).

700 – 799.99 Arts and Recreation: Landscaping, architecture, sculpture, ceramics, drawing, painting, graphic arts, photography, music and sports are all found in the 700s.  Comic collections (Calvin and Hobbes, the Far Side, for example) are in the 740s and sports and game occupy the 790s.  Young and old sports fans alike will find things to make them happy, as will anyone working on a major outside renovation!

800 – 899.99 Literature: When you want to find the classics, look no further.  The 800s hold American literature, rhetoric, Old English literature (Shakespeare), classic and modern Greek literature (the plays), and poetry.  Literature in other languages such as French and Italian is also found here – some beautiful reading if you have the patience for it.

900 – 999.99 History and Geography: Really, what is more fun than history?  Geography, travel guides, biographies, genealogy, and the history of the world are found in the 900s. The biographies are my favorite, but if you are interested in the history and customs of other countries, this is the section for you.

And there you have it – an easy cheat sheet for searching the non-fiction.  Of course, there will always be books that are placed where it makes no sense, nothing is ever perfect.  And, as always, the librarians are happy to help you!  Come by and see us.

NOTE: If this article looks familiar, you might have read it before.  The majority of this article was published 07-04-2013 in the Pipestone County Star. As Stephanie is recovering from knee surgery, she is recycling a few articles for the month of March.  She begs forgiveness.

Winter Weather:  We tend to follow the lead of Pipestone Area Schools.  If the school is closed, we will also be closed.  If the school closes early, we stay open for about a half hour afterwards to make sure all the kids can get picked up.  If the school has a two hour late start, we are not affected and will open at our regular time of 10 AM.

PAFL Update:  Pipestone Area Friends of the Library is looking for members – anyone who is a friend to Meinders Library is welcome to join!  The Friends group works hard to promote the library, raise money for projects, and organize their yearly book sale, in addition to the HUGE amount of support they provide throughout the year.  Call us for the date of the next meeting!

If you have questions or have a book you’d like to reserve or renew, please don’t hesitate to give us a call at (507) 825-6714.  The hours for Meinders Library are Monday through Thursday from 10 AM – 8 PM, and Friday from 10 AM to 5 PM and Saturday from 10AM to Noon.  Summer hours are in effect from Memorial Day weekend until Labor Day Weekend.  Meinders Community Library is located at 1401 7th Street SW, on the south side of the high school.