Thursday, October 30, 2014

Veteran's Day

Pipestone County Star 11-06-2014

I come from a line of veterans.  My grandfather, from Worthington, Minnesota, served in India during World War II as a veterinarian.  My father was a Marine, and though he didn’t serve during a war, he did his patriotic duty.  My husband was in the Army and served in Germany, then Iraq for Operation Desert Storm.  His parents, in turn, were both in the Air Force and met each other in the service.  Veterans Day is a day when we should recognize and celebrate the bravery and sacrifice that soldiers from all branches of the military have made for us.  Our soldiers come in all ages, in both sexes, all religions, and all colors.  They fought to keep our country free and democratic – to make us what we are today.  Make sure to thank them.

Veteran’s Day began as Armistice Day in 1919, the day Woodrow Wilson declared a national holiday to celebrate the end of the first World War.  Germany surrendered at 11 AM on November 11, 1918, so it was fitting that we should honor that day.  In remembrance, moments of silence are observed and many people, even then, wore red poppies to honor the battle fought among those flowers on Flanders Field, a particularly bloody battle in 1914.

In 1954, following the recovery from World War Two, Armistice Day became Veteran’s Day, to honor all the soldiers who have served our country, not just those from World War One.

The library has several movies that have been critically acclaimed for showing how it was for soldiers.  If they interest you, come in and check them out.

Band of Brothers (Vietnam)
This series originally aired on HBO and was hailed as one of the best war series ever made.  It was produced by Tom Hanks and Steven Spielberg and the library has the complete, 10-part set.  There is also a disc that includes a documentary on the Easy Company and several other special features.

The Hurt Locker (Iraq – Kathryn Bigelow)
This movie follows an Explosive Ordinance Disposal team through a tour in Iraq and is one of the grittiest, most engrossing war movies I’ve seen in a long time.  It won for both Best Picture and Best Director in the 2010 Academy Awards.  I’ve never seen a movie that portrayed war as a drug, but Bigelow did an excellent job proving that for me.

The War (World War II – Ken Burns)
A quarter of this film centers on the community of Luverne, Minnesota, where the movie was originally screened.  This set contains all seven parts of the documentary, as well as numerous special features.  It lasts for 15 hours and took six years of work.  The object of the documentary was to show how to war affected those left at home and Burns uses four different towns in the United States to paint a picture of life during those years.

Flags of Our Fathers (World War II – Clint Eastwood)
This movie, directed by Academy Award Winner Clint Eastwood and nominated for Oscars itself, show the American side of the Battle of Iwo Jima. 

And if you don’t feel like watching a movie or the television, the library has a huge selection of books, both fiction and non-fiction, depicting the wars this country has fought.  I don’t have space to list them all, but here are two that may spark interest.

The Dardanelles Disaster by Dan Van Der Vat (World War I)
In 1915, the British Navy failed to capture Constantinople and through there, a sea route to Russia.  Van Der Vat is a naval military historian who writes that this failure not only prolonged the war, but led to the Russian Revolution and contributed to the destabilization in the Middle East.  The book is fascinating and enlightening and a must read for any military historian and others interested.

Soul Survivor by Bruce and Andrea Leininger(World War II – and the Present)
This book might be a bit beyond what would normally be considered war-related, but you’ll have to bear with me.  About a year ago, a young man appeared on Oprah with his parents, who had a very odd story to tell.  That story is chronicled in this book and gives rise to questions of reincarnation.  Was James Leininger a reincarnated World War II pilot?  As a toddler, James would say and do things that led his parents to an incredible discovery.

Unbroken, Laura Hillenbrand (World War II)
This is one of the most popular books in the library, and is an extraordinary story.  As a young man, Louis Zamperini was a juvenile delinquent who managed to channel himself into running and ran all the way to the Berlin Olympics.  When the war started, Zamperini became and airman.  One May afternoon, his life changed dramatically when his plane went down in the ocean.  Despite all odds, he survived on a life raft, but ahead of him lay thousands of miles of open ocean.  The book is amazing and definitely worth the read.

To all the veterans reading this article, I salute you.  My salute may not be as crisp as my husband’s, my father’s, or my grandfather’s, but I salute you just the same.  From infantryman to general, thank you for serving our country.  We would not be the America we are today without you.

PAFL Update:  Pipestone Area Friends of the Library is looking for members – anyone who is a friend to Meinders Library is welcome to join!  The Friends group works hard to promote the library, raise money for projects, and organize their yearly book sale, in addition to the HUGE amount of support they provide throughout the year.  Call for the date of their next meeting.

If you have questions or have a book you’d like to reserve or renew, please don’t hesitate to give us a call at (507) 825-6714.  The hours for Meinders Library are Monday through Thursday from 10 AM – 8 PM, and Friday and Saturday from 10 AM – 5 PM.  Meinders Community Library is located at 1401 7th Street SW, on the south side of the high school.


Wednesday, October 1, 2014

New Inspirations

Pipestone County Star 10-09-2014

What is Inspirational Fiction?  Most commonly in the United States, the term refers to fiction that concentrates on the characters’ relationships with the Christian God and has become synonymous with Christian Fiction, though this is not always the case.

The definition of Christian Fiction is very simple - it has at its core biblically-based attitudes.  The books typically have a strong Christian theme with very little profanity, sexual content, or violence.  Christian fiction is often written in series to show that faith can grow over time and they have faith-based conflicts, a concentration on morality, and/or they post religious questions – with or without answers.

We usually try to order one or two new series every few months to keep our readers’ interest.  Over the past month or so, we have gotten the following series into the library:

The Dakota series, Lauraine Snelling
The titles in this series include Dakota Dawn, Dakota Dream, and Dakota Dusk.  There are two more (Dakota December and Dakota Destiny) in the series which will be ordered at a later date.  While this is not a new series, it is one that the library did not own and we felt it would add to the collection.  These books follow the lives of immigrant women moving to North Dakota, and centers around the lives people lead in the small community of Soldahl.  The stories are short, but full of life and the characters who people them will touch your heart.

Chronicles of the Kings, Lynn Austin
This series contains five titles: Gods and Kings, Song of Redemption, The Strength of His Hand, Faith of My Fathers, and Among the Gods.  The story begins with Hezekiah, the second son of King Ahaz, who encounters Yahweh as he struggles with his father’s obsession with the idol Molech.  The saga continues with Hezekiah growing into kingship, struggling with a barren wife (who makes an unforgivable pact with a foreign goddess), and then follows his descendants in their journey of faith.  And it is not an easy journey – there are many pitfalls along the way.  The story is involved and enjoyable, with historical detail that will intrigue the reader. 

Because the shelving section for inspirational fiction is not as large as some bigger libraries (we’re not the only ones with this problem), Meinders has started a rotation with a few other Plum Creek libraries.  We trade about twenty books at a time, including a few complete series, to ensure that our readers get a varied selection.  So far we have done one trade and it worked very well – there are only two books in the rotation left on the shelf!  Soon we will be trading again and will bring more books from different places in – hopefully ones that will open eyes to new authors and new series.

So in this time of gloominess, as summer slowly turns to fall, pick up an inspirational book and transport yourself somewhere more thoughtful and uplifting.

Upcoming Events: October 25th is a FREE Bus trip to New Ulm, with the bus leaving at 7:15 AM from the overflow parking lot at the high school.  We will be visiting the Wanda Gag House, Schell’s Brewery, the Brown County Historical Society, and perhaps seeing the Glockenspiel before returning back to Pipestone around 5:30.  You must have a library card and you must be over 21.  Call – there may still be space!

PAFL Update:  Pipestone Area Friends of the Library is looking for members – anyone who is a friend to Meinders Library is welcome to join!  The Friends group works hard to promote the library, raise money for projects, and organize their yearly book sale, in addition to the HUGE amount of support they provide throughout the year.  Call us for the date of the next meeting!


If you have questions or have a book you’d like to reserve or renew, please don’t hesitate to give us a call at (507) 825-6714.  The hours for Meinders Library are Monday through Thursday from 10 AM – 8 PM, and Friday and Saturday from 10 AM to 5 PM.  Meinders Community Library is located at 1401 7th Street SW, on the south side of the high school.

Fall Into Books

Pipestone County Star 10-23-2014

Autumn has arrived.  The colors have changed, the leaves have made heaps on our lawns.  Mornings are very crisp, evenings even more so, but the stars on clear nights are amazing.  Truth be told, this is my favorite time of year and I do look forward to it, even if I miss my garden.

Here are some books to help get you in the mood, though possibly not in the way you were expecting.  I don’t think any of these books necessarily involve the fall season, but they DO have “fall” in their title.  Oh, and one more catch – they’re all young adult.  Go ahead and read them, though.  We won’t tell everyone that you’re no longer a “young” adult.  We read them, too.

Before I Fall, Lauren Oliver
This is Oliver’s first book and is absolutely amazing.  Samantha Kingston is one of the most popular girls in school and Feburyar12, known as Cupid Day, should be the best day of the year.  Flowers, candy, everything that comes with being the girl at the top.  Or it SHOULD be the best day – Samantha dies in a terrible accident that night.  When she wakes up in the morning (yes, she wakes up), she begins to live that last day over again, learning that even the tiniest changes make a big impact in the outcome.  She proceeds to live that day over seven times.  You’ll have to read it to learn the end.

City of Fallen Angels, Cassandra Clare
This is book four of the Mortal Instruments series and I recommend reading the other three first.  However, this one is quite fun.  Clary is relieved now that the war is over between the Shadowhunters and the Downworlders.  She herself is training to become a Shadowhunter and she can finally refer to the love of her life as her “boyfriend.”  But all is not as peaceful as it seems and pretty soon, Clary becomes aware that something else is going on, something that might cause another war.  And it’s all her fault.

Falling Boy, Allison McGhee
Joseph was paralyzed in a mysterious accident and finds himself living in Minneapolis with his father, working at a bakery during a particularly hot summer.  He makes two good friends, Zap and Enzo, and through them begins to take another look at the events that caused him to end up in a wheelchair.  Enzo wants to believe that he’s a superhero.  Is he? What does it really mean to be a superhero?

Fall for Anything, Courtney Summers
Eddie Reeves loves her father very much.  That is, until he throws himself off a warehouse.  Eddie is left full of questions – Why?  Why did he do it? Why did he leave her and her mother like that? It isn’t long before she meets her father’s student, Culler, and the two develop a relationship that teeters on romantic, but is built from loss.  Together, they try to solve the questions that both of them have, but isn’t it sometimes better to leave some questions unanswered?

Fall of Five, Pittacus Lore
This is also the fourth book in a series that starts with I am Number Four.  At first, I thought this series would be a bit silly (there’s aliens), but it’s actually fantastic and I highly recommend it.  The group of young people known as the Garde are mostly reunited, but they do not have the power yet to overcome their arch enemies, the Mogadoriens.  They need more preparation and more time, which is possibly running out.  And then they get a signal in the form of a crop circle from Number Five.  They really need Five – it could be a tipping point.  But is the signal a trap?

Happy Fall, everyone!! It’s well under way and I hope that it’s treating you well.  Enjoy the season and make sure to eat things flavored with pumpkin.  That seems to be the thing to do this time of year.

Upcoming Events: October 25th is a FREE Bus trip to New Ulm, with the bus leaving at 7:15 AM from the overflow parking lot at the high school.  We will be visiting the Wanda Gag House, Schell’s Brewery, the Brown County Historical Society, and perhaps seeing the Glockenspiel before returning back to Pipestone around 5:30.  You must have a library card and you must be over 21.  Call – there may still be space!


PAFL Update:  Pipestone Area Friends of the Library is looking for members – anyone who is a friend to Meinders Library is welcome to join!  The Friends group works hard to promote the library, raise money for projects, and organize their yearly book sale, in addition to the HUGE amount of support they provide throughout the year.  Call us for the date of the next meeting!

If you have questions or have a book you’d like to reserve or renew, please don’t hesitate to give us a call at (507) 825-6714.  The hours for Meinders Library are Monday through Thursday from 10 AM – 8 PM, and Friday and Saturday from 10 AM to 5 PM.  Meinders Community Library is located at 1401 7th Street SW, on the south side of the high school.


Monday, September 15, 2014

Banned Books Week 2014

Banned Books Week is an annual event celebrating the freedom to read.  This year, the dates of Banned Books Week are from September 21st until September 27th and it highlights the value of free and open access to information.  Banned Books Week brings together the entire book community –- librarians, booksellers, publishers, journalists, teachers, and readers of all types –- in shared support of the freedom to seek and to express ideas, even those some consider unorthodox or unpopular.  
  
Banned Books Week was launched in 1982 in response to a sudden surge in the number of challenges to books in schools, bookstores and libraries. 

What is the difference between a challenge and banning?
A challenge is an attempt to remove or restrict materials, based upon the objections of a person or group.  A banning is the removal of those materials.  Challenges do not simply involve a person expressing a point of view; rather, they are an attempt to remove material from the curriculum or library, thereby restricting the access of others.  Due to the commitment of librarians, teachers, parents, students and other concerned citizens, most challenges are unsuccessful and most materials are retained in the school curriculum or library collection.

Why are books challenged?
Books usually are challenged with the best intentions—to protect others, frequently children, from difficult ideas and information.   Censorship can be subtle, almost imperceptible, as well as blatant and overt, but, nonetheless, harmful.  

Often challenges are motivated by a desire to protect children from “inappropriate” sexual content or “offensive” language. The following were the top three reasons cited for challenging materials as reported to the Office of Intellectual Freedom:
·         the material was considered to be "sexually explicit"
·         the material contained "offensive language"
·         the materials was "unsuited to any age group"

Although this is a commendable motivation, Free Access to Libraries for Minors, an interpretation of the Library Bill of Rights (ALA's basic policy concerning access to information) states that, “Librarians and governing bodies should maintain that parents—and only parents—have the right and the responsibility to restrict the access of their children—and only their children—to library resources.” Censorship by librarians of constitutionally protected speech, whether for protection or for any other reason, violates the First Amendment.

If we are to continue to protect our First Amendment, we would do well to keep in mind these words of Noam Chomsky:
“If we don't believe in freedom of expression for people we despise, we don't believe in it at all.”

Who Challenges Books?
Throughout history, more and different kinds of people and groups of all persuasions than you might first suppose, who, for all sorts of reasons, have attempted—and continue to attempt—to suppress anything that conflicts with or anyone who disagrees with their own beliefs.

According to the Challenges by Initiator, Institution, Type, and Year, parents challenge materials more often than any other group.

Top Ten Challenged books of 2013:
There were 307 challenges this year and the following books were the most “popular”
1.       Captain Underpants (series), Dav Pilkey
2.       The Bluest Eye, Tony Morrison
3.       The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, Sherman Alexie
4.       Fifty Shades of Grey, E.L. James
5.       The Hunger Games, Suzanne Collins
6.       A bad Boy Can Be Good For A Girl, Tanya Lee Stone
7.       Looking for Alaska, John Green
8.       The Perks of Being a Wallflower, Stephen Chbosky
9.       Bless Me, Ultima, Rudolfo, Anaya
10.   Bone (Series), Jeff Smith

If you would like to know the reasons for the challenges, come in to the library and we can show you on our Banned Books Flyer.  Or better yet, check one of them out and read it for yourself!!

Upcoming Events: Maurice Bickford will be presenting a talk on the Star Spangled Banner and how it has changed over the years on October 4th at 2:00 PM.  Join us to learn about our flag!  Also, we will be taking a bus trip to New Ulm in October and it will be FREE to library patrons.  Keep your eyes peeled for more information.

PAFL Update:  Pipestone Area Friends of the Library is looking for members – anyone who is a friend to Meinders Library is welcome to join!  The Friends group works hard to promote the library, raise money for projects, and organize their yearly book sale, in addition to the HUGE amount of support they provide throughout the year.  Call us for the date of the next meeting!

If you have questions or have a book you’d like to reserve or renew, please don’t hesitate to give us a call at (507) 825-6714.  The hours for Meinders Library are Monday through Thursday from 10 AM – 8 PM, and Friday and Saturday from 10 AM to 5 PM.  Meinders Community Library is located at 1401 7th Street SW, on the south side of the high school.


Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Labor Day

School starts the day after Labor Day.  Honestly, when I hear that, I think “Labor Day already?” and go back to whatever else I was doing.  I don’t think about what Labor Day actually stands for.  Do you?

Labor Day is a federal holiday meant to celebrate the achievements of American workers, both socially and economically.   The very first Labor Day was celebrated in New York City on Tuesday, September 5, 1882.  The Central Labor Union organized the holiday just for New York, with no other cities taking place.  They celebrated the holiday again the following year, keeping the date so the holiday fell on a Monday, giving workers a three day weekend.

In 1884, the City of New York declared that the first Monday in September would be known as Labor Day from then on out and the Central Labor Union encouraged other cities to follow suit.  In 1885, many of the industrial centers around the United States celebrated the date.  Since these first holidays were celebrated by municipal ordinance, the cities rallied to push the states to pass laws to recognize the holiday on a state level, instead of just city by city.  New York State was the first to have a bill before its lawmakers, but Oregon succeeded in passing its bill first on February 21, 1887.  By 1894, 23 states had followed in Oregon’s footsteps and on June 28 of 1894, Congress passed a law making Labor Day a federal holiday.

The first proposal for the holiday outlined a suggested celebration.  According to the proposal, towns were to have a street parade to “exhibit to the public the strength and esprit de corps of the trade and labor organizations of the community.”  That parade was to be followed by a festival for the pleasure and enjoyment of the working families.  This became the pattern for the celebration of Labor Day all over the country.

As cities grew larger and huge parades became more difficult to organize, some areas turned to televising speeches from leading union officials, educators, labor leaders, and industrialists to celebrate the holiday.  More recently, families have used Labor Day as a last hurrah before school starts, one last long weekend available before the kids have a daily schedule almost as demanding as their parents. 

Labor Day signifies the end of the summer for most people, and strangely enough, the end of a fashion season.  So, ladies, once Labor Day arrives, we can no longer wear white clothing.  Does anyone know why that is?  I’ve heard it’s because the Navy switches their uniforms from white to blue, but I can’t confirm that.  If anyone knows the origin of this tradition, give me a call at the library!

PAFL Update:  Pipestone Area Friends of the Library is looking for members – anyone who is a friend to Meinders Library is welcome to join!  The Friends group works hard to promote the library, raise money for projects, and organize their yearly book sale, in addition to the HUGE amount of support they provide throughout the year.  Call us for the date of the next meeting!

If you have questions or have a book you’d like to reserve or renew, please don’t hesitate to give us a call at (507) 825-6714.  The winter hours (starting September 2nd) for Meinders Library are Monday through Thursday from 10 AM – 8 PM, and Friday and Saturday from 10 AM – 5 PM.  Meinders Community Library is located at 1401 7th Street SW, on the south side of the high school.


Monday, July 21, 2014

Biographies of Interest

Who out there is an armchair adventurer?  Most of the time, I am, with a few exceptions.  I love to read travalogues and live vicariously through the adventures that other people experience.  But daily life can be its own adventure, especially for people who experience great hardship, dangerous or traumatic events, or simply those people whose culture is so vastly different from ours that it is difficult to comprehend. 

Here are a few biographies and autobiographies to get you started – there are extraordinary people in our world.  Some we will meet along the way, others we can read about in books, but the stories these people have to share with us will change the way you think of the world.

The Bite of the Mango, Mariatu Kamara with Susan McClelland
Kamara grew up in a small village in Sierra Leone, during a conflict that created hundreds of thousands of refugees.  In her small village, the rumors of rebel attacks were just that – no one had seen them first hand, no one believed they were really happening.  Until one day, when Kamara was 12 years old.  She set out for a neighboring village and she never arrived.  Heavily armed soldiers kidnapped her, tortured her, and cut off both her hands.  She survives, makes her way to Freetown, and becomes a beggar to keep herself alive.  Today she lives in Toronto, Canada, but it was a long road and her story shows just how resilient she is.

Hole in My Life, Jack Gantos
Gantos is an award-winning author of children’s books and lives with his wife in Massachusetts.   In this book, he tells readers about the biggest mistake of his life – the time when he needed adventure so he agreed to sail a yacht loaded with hasish from the Virgin Islands to New York City.  Once there, he was to sell the drugs but would retain ten thousand dollars for his trouble.  Unfortunately for Gantos, federal agents knew what was going on and busted him and his partners at the Chelsea Hotel.  Gantos servied six years in prison.  This is the story of those years and how his youth ended in the tiny cell and how the entire experience made him into the writer he is today.

The Other Side of the Sky, Farah Ahmedi  with Tamim Ansary
A childhood in Afghanistan is no picnic, much less for Farah Ahmedi.  As a child, she grew used to the sound of gunfire and the sight of falling bombs, even when they took her family from her.  Escaping death when she stepped on a landmine was one of only a handful of blessings that was bestowed upon her.  Finally it becomes too much for her to bear and she flees her beloved country to refugee camps in the mountains before making a journey to the United States.  Her tale is remarkable and inspiring, forcing us all to examine our own lives and the problems we are so sure we have, realizing they are nothing compared to some of what she suffered.

Rachel’s Tears: The Spiritual Journey of Columbine Martyr Rachel Scott, Beth Nimmo and Darrel Scott
There isn’t a lot of information I can give about this book without taking away something from the reading.  Rachel Scott was a very typical teenage girl, except for her strong faith in God.  She struggled, as many do, she learned, she believed in the depths of her heart.  And then, on the 20th of April in 1999, she was shot and killed at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colorado.  This book uses her journals and the words of her parents to explore her life and give us a window into her faithful soul.


The Unwanted, Kien Nguyen
Nguyen is the son of a Vietnamese woman and an American man and spent his early childhood in Vietnam with his mother, the co-president of a bank.  His house was large, his mother threw parties, they had servants, everything a child could have ever wanted.  Until the night it changed.  Amidst the destruction of the old politicos, the family loses everything and Nguyen and his mother are forced to Saigon, into an apartment and a community where they don’t fit, especially Nguyen with his mixed blood.  A very emotional book, Nguyen does an excellent job pulling us into the desperation his life becomes before he manages to immigrate to the United States in 1985.

Warrior Princess, Princess Kasune Zulu with Belinda Collins
Princess Kasune Zulu began her life by the shores of Victoria Falls, living a very privileged life in Zambia.  Life was idyllic until a mystery ailment claimed the lives of her parents, her brother, and her baby sister.  The disease would become known as AIDS and it wasn’t until she turned 21 that Princess Kasune Zulu learned that she was also infected.  That realization took her from Zambia to the White House and the United Nations.  She has earned international acclaim for her work as an ambassador for vulnerable children and her passion for her work is unequaled.  Her life may be uncertain, but she is not wasting one single minute of it.

SRP Update: SRP activities are finished, but reading for prizes will continue until August 31 – we’ve got some great prizes, so keep reading!

PAFL Update:  Pipestone Area Friends of the Library is looking for members – anyone who is a friend to Meinders Library is welcome to join!  The Friends group works hard to promote the library, raise money for projects, and organize their yearly book sale, in addition to the HUGE amount of support they provide throughout the year.  Call for the date of their next meeting.

If you have questions or have a book you’d like to reserve or renew, please don’t hesitate to give us a call at (507) 825-6714.  The summer hours for Meinders Library (starting Memorial Day weekend) are Monday through Thursday from 10 AM – 8 PM, and Friday from 10 AM – 5 PM and Saturday from 10 AM - Noon.  Meinders Community Library is located at 1401 7th Street SW, on the south side of the high school.





Wednesday, July 9, 2014

Family Friendly Audio

Pipestone County Star 07-17-2014

Ah, the joys of long family car trips.  Having just done one, it went much better than I expected, but I let my kids watch DVDs and I drive a mini-van, so there’s space.  But if you don’t have a DVD player or very much space?  Audio books are possibly the best way to go!  So here are a few choices that everyone in the family could listen to, kids and adults alike.  I have listened to all of these with my children (ages 8 and 9 now, though probably closer to 6 and 7 when we started books on tape), and I can vouch for all of them being a good listen.

Beyond the Spiderwick Chronicles: The Nixie’s Song (Book 1), by Tony DiTerlizzi and Holly Black
Two kids, thrown together by circumstance when their parents married.  And the girl brought a book with her, a book that is heavy and full of pictures of fairies, which everyone knows aren’t real, right? Think again, kid!  Once you know, and once THEY know you know, you can’t go back! Read by Andrew McCarthy, of brat pack fame.

Because of Winn-Dixie, by Kate DiCamillo
There is a supermarket in Florida named Winn-Dixie, and ten year old India decides to name the stray dog she’s adopted after the place where they met.  India has just moved to town and feels a little lost.  But before too long, India and her father, with some help from the dog, realize that life is so much more wonderful than they thought it was.  Read by Cherry Jones.

Millions, by Frank Cottrell Boyce
Damian Cunningham was certainly not expecting a bag filled with money to drop out of the sky at his feet.  He wasn’t expecting to be rich, but it all comes with a catch – he and his brother only have seventeen days in which they can spend the money before it isn’t even worth the paper it was printed on.  And that’s not all – the money was stolen and the men who stole it want it back.  Read by Simon Jones – a warning: the movie made me cry.

Harry Potter series, by JK Rowling
Though most people have read these books, I discovered that the audios are fantastic!  The reader, Jim Dale, does voices and is incredibly entertaining.  Plus, there’s seven of them and some of them have a LARGE number of discs, so this is something that can last a very long time.  Join Harry on his journey through schooling at the Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry and his quest to destroy Lord Voldemort.  These audiobooks are the best!

Geronimo Stilton series, by Geronimo Stilton
These books center around a mouse reporter and the crazy capers he gets up to, usually crazy adventures in far off places.  The stories are short and there are three in each volume.  These are great for younger children who can’t follow too intricate of a plotline.  Read by Edward Herrmann, they are sure to entertain.

A Series of Unfortunate Events (Series) by Lemony Snicket
These are multi-voice recordings, meaning there is more than one reader.  While the main narrator is Tim Curry, others read with him, portraying various characters.  These books come with a warning, that if you can’t handle “a tragic fire, a nefarious villain, itchy clothing, and cold porridge for breakfast,” you best find something else.   These books are humorous in a rather dark and gothic kind of way and are thoroughly enjoyable in audio.

SRP Update: The Summer Reading Program sign-up has started with weekly activity days starting June 17th (Tuesday) at 2:00 PM.  Activities will continue on Tuesdays until the end of July.

PAFL Update:  Pipestone Area Friends of the Library is looking for members – anyone who is a friend to Meinders Library is welcome to join!  The Friends group works hard to promote the library, raise money for projects, and organize their yearly book sale, in addition to the HUGE amount of support they provide throughout the year.  Call for the date of their next meeting.

If you have questions or have a book you’d like to reserve or renew, please don’t hesitate to give us a call at (507) 825-6714.  The summer hours for Meinders Library (starting Memorial Day weekend) are Monday through Thursday from 10 AM – 8 PM, and Friday from 10 AM – 5 PM and Saturday from 10 AM - Noon.  Meinders Community Library is located at 1401 7th Street SW, on the south side of the high school.