Wednesday, March 25, 2015

National Library Week, April 12-19 2015

National Library Week is April 12 – 19, 2015!  It’s a great week to celebrate your local library and we’ve decided to give everyone a bit of a break! If you bring back overdue materials during that week, there will be no fines!  Instead, we are asking people to bring non-expired, non-perishable food items for donation to the food bank in place of money.
                             
So, for example, if you have four overdue items and $15 in fines, you can bring back your items and three cans of food and you’ll be good to go!  We are requesting one food item per $5 in fines. 

If you have outstanding fines (but have already returned the materials), you can bring in food during this week to have those fines forgiven with the same value – one food item per $5 in fines.

Not only would we like to see our materials again, we would also like to get as many patrons as possible back in good standing, so we hope you can take advantage of this fine-free week!  Please keep in mind, this is only good during library hours between April 12 and 19.  You need to return your materials to a librarian in order to get your fines forgiven.

Have a great April!


If you have questions or have a book you’d like to reserve or renew, please don’t hesitate to give us a call at (507) 825-6714.  The hours for Meinders Library are Monday through Thursday from 10 AM – 8 PM, and Friday and Saturday from 10 AM – 5 PM.  Meinders Community Library is located at 1401 7th Street SW, on the south side of the high school.

Straw Bale Gardening April 22, 2015 5:00 PM

Meinders Library is very excited to welcome Joel Karsten for Straw Bale Gardening on April 22nd at 5:00 in celebration of Earth Day!!

Straw Bale Gardens – Breaking New Ground!  Grow a garden without pulling weeds, without the heavy lifting and without getting down on your hands and knees like traditional gardening requires.  If you thought the only place to grow healthy vegetable crops was in black dirt, you’ll be inspired by the science and biology Karsten offers in his presentation.  Learn to grow a bountiful garden using no herbicides, insecticides or pesticides.  Learn to plant a wide variety of vegetables, root crops, vine crops, and even beautiful flowers, directly into your “conditioned” straw bales, much earlier in the season than you’re used to.  Discover how any backyard, concrete patio, rooftop or driveway can become a productive garden.  Learn the details of this revolutionary and easy gardening method to create a beautiful and productive garden, without lifting a shovel and without using soil.

Come to the library and learn the fundamental skills needed to create your own straw bale garden!  Just two bales of straw can produce 240 tomatoes, ten heads of garlic, six quarts of basil, three quarts of thyme, and costs less than $20! 

JOEL KARSTEN, a farm boy who grew up tending a soil garden like other gardeners have for centuries, shook up the gardening world with his first book describing his breakthrough Straw Bale Gardening concept.  The New York Times called Straw Bale Gardening “a revolutionary gardening method” and his ideas have been enthusiastically embraced globally, making his books best-sellers in many languages.  Karsten earned a BS in Horticulture from the University of Minnesota and spends his summers tending his vegetable garden, doing research, and experimenting with new ideas and methods he can pass along to his followers.  He is a popular speaker, making appearances around the world at events that celebrate innovation, garden enthusiasts and healthy lifestyles. He is renowned for his social media presence, his popular blog, and millions of on-line impressions.  Karsten has inspired tens of thousands of first-time gardeners and a legion of “seasoned” growers who have found a new and better way to pursue their passion.  His methods have enabled “retired” gardeners to begin gardening again since his method eliminates the physical challenges found in traditional soil gardening.  Discover more information about Karsten and his revolutionary methods at www.StrawBaleGardens.com.  Links to his Blog, Newsletter, Facebook page, YouTube Channel, Twitter feed and Google Plus pages can all be found on his website.


If you have questions or have a book you’d like to reserve or renew, please don’t hesitate to give us a call at (507) 825-6714.  The hours for Meinders Library are Monday through Thursday from 10 AM – 8 PM, and Friday and Saturday from 10 AM – 5 PM.  Meinders Community Library is located at 1401 7th Street SW, on the south side of the high school.

Thursday, February 19, 2015

Where Is That Book?


Pipestone County Star  - 02-26-2015

So there’s a particular non-fiction book you want to find and coming to the library seems so overwhelming.  There are a LOT of books in non-fiction and they’re not organized in alphabetical order.  Turns out, there’s three choices for libraries to select from when shelving the non-fiction collection: the Dewey Decimal system, the Library of Congress system, and BISAC, which is mainly used in retail.

Dewey Decimal System:
This is how Meinders Library organizes their non-fiction.  The Dewey Decimal System is relatively easy to understand, but not completely logical.  It uses numbers from 001 to 999, with up to four decimal places (so 001.0001 to 999.9999).  001 starts off with computers and the internet, and 990 is the section for the History of Other Regions, namely Australia.  We have basic guides that we would be happy to give any patron who asked and all our endcaps are marked with the numbers corresponding to those shelves.  The more you use it, the more numbers you can remember: 921 is biography, 811 is poetry, 636.1 is horse books, etc.

Library of Congress:
Government entities and many academic libraries use the system developed by the Library of Congress.  The system relies on using most of the letters of the alphabet to designate basic subject areas.  Within each of those subject areas are sub-categories indicated by another letter, then a series of numbers to place that book in its exact location. SB423.T46 1965 is a book titled Goldfish Pools, Water-lilies, and Tropical Fishes.  S = Agriculture, B=Plant Culture, 423 indicates the class of plants.  If you search the Library of Congress catalogue, anything that begins SB423 is about ponds and their foliage.  T46 places the book into order with all the other books in that category (extremely confusing – check out Wikipedia “Library of Congress Classification” for an entire list of their subject headings).

BISAC:
Do you find it easy to search for a book at Barnes and Noble?  They use BISAC for their organization.   BISAC stands for Book Industry Standards and Communication.   There are fifty categories for non-fiction, ranging from Antiques and Collectibles to True Crime.  There are sections for drama, poetry, pets, education, self-help, etc.   Within each of those categories, books are arranged alphabetically by author.  Rather than having numbers on the spine, they have a listed section.

Some libraries have already done away with the top two methods of organization in favor of BISAC, including another joint-use (city, county, and school) library in Maricopa County, Arizona and the McMillan Memorial Library in Wisconsin.

As much as I love the idea of BISAC, Plum Creek requires that we use the Dewey Decimal system in our library.  Do you think it’s easier or harder to find books that way?  Feel free to weigh in on Facebook or Twitter using #bisacvsdewey. 

NOTE: If this article looks familiar, you might have read it before.  The majority of this article was published 05-24-2012 in the Pipestone County Star. As Stephanie is recovering from knee surgery, she is recycling a few articles for the month of March.  She begs forgiveness.

Winter Weather:  We tend to follow the lead of Pipestone Area Schools.  If the school is closed, we will also be closed.  If the school closes early, we stay open for about a half hour afterwards to make sure all the kids can get picked up.  If the school has a two hour late start, we are not affected and will open at our regular time of 10 AM.


PAFL Update:  Pipestone Area Friends of the Library is looking for members – anyone who is a friend to Meinders Library is welcome to join!  The Friends group works hard to promote the library, raise money for projects, and organize their yearly book sale, in addition to the HUGE amount of support they provide throughout the year.  Call us for the date of the next meeting!

If you have questions or have a book you’d like to reserve or renew, please don’t hesitate to give us a call at (507) 825-6714.  The summer hours for Meinders Library are Monday through Thursday from 10 AM – 8 PM, Friday from 10 AM – 5 PM, and Saturday from 10AM to Noon.  Meinders Community Library is located at 1401 7th Street SW, on the south side of the high school.



That Darned Dewey


Pipestone County Star – 03-12-2015

To continue the article from last week about the various ways to organize non-fiction, here is a handy guide to searching for books in the Dewey Decimal System.

Dewey Decimal uses a series of numbers from 0 -999.99 to organize books into similar subjects.  Inside the number values, the books are organized by author’s last name.

000 – 099.99 Information: At the beginning of the numbers, you will find books on computers, library science, books of facts (Guinness World Record books are very popular here!) , journalism and the media, quotation books, and any rare books.  We don’t have rare books and manuscripts at the Pipestone Library, but other libraries in bigger communities might have some.

100 – 199.99 Philosophy and Psychology: These numbers contain philosophy, metaphysics, astrology and the occult, psychology, logic, and ethics – all the things for light summer reading, right?  I know, I know…very few people actually want anything out of this section, but some of the material in there is really fun.

200 – 299.99 Religion: Here we get a little more interesting.  Religion, religious theory, Bibles (found in the 220s), the history and organization of the Christian church, and all other religious denominations can be found in these numbers.  Spiritual counseling also falls into this area, as well as the other holy books from other religions.

300 – 399.99 Social Sciences: Anthropology (my major in college) is found here, as well as statistics, political science, economics, law, public administration and military science, education, commerce, etiquette, and folklore.  Some great stuff if you enjoy thinking while you read (sometimes I do, sometimes I don’t!).

400 – 499.99 Language: Language and linguistics make up the 400s.  English and Old English, German, French, Italian, Spanish, Latin, and many others are found in this section, both learning to speak those languages and books written in those languages.

500 – 599.99 Science:  Just what you were waiting for, right?? Science, mathematics, astronomy, physics, chemistry, astronomy, geology, fossils (DINOSAURS!!) biology, plants, and animals are all found in this area.  Kids LOVE these books, especially the dinosaurs and animals.  Plant and bird lovers are BOUND to find something that excites them, as well as gardeners.

600 – 699.99 Technology: Medical science, technology, engineering, agriculture, home and family management, business, chemical engineering, and building and construction are found here.  If you have a remodeling project or are keen on reorganizing your home, this is the place for you.  Cookbooks are also found here (641.5).

700 – 799.99 Arts and Recreation: Landscaping, architecture, sculpture, ceramics, drawing, painting, graphic arts, photography, music and sports are all found in the 700s.  Comic collections (Calvin and Hobbes, the Far Side, for example) are in the 740s and sports and game occupy the 790s.  Young and old sports fans alike will find things to make them happy, as will anyone working on a major outside renovation!

800 – 899.99 Literature: When you want to find the classics, look no further.  The 800s hold American literature, rhetoric, Old English literature (Shakespeare), classic and modern Greek literature (the plays), and poetry.  Literature in other languages such as French and Italian is also found here – some beautiful reading if you have the patience for it.

900 – 999.99 History and Geography: Really, what is more fun than history?  Geography, travel guides, biographies, genealogy, and the history of the world are found in the 900s. The biographies are my favorite, but if you are interested in the history and customs of other countries, this is the section for you.

And there you have it – an easy cheat sheet for searching the non-fiction.  Of course, there will always be books that are placed where it makes no sense, nothing is ever perfect.  And, as always, the librarians are happy to help you!  Come by and see us.

NOTE: If this article looks familiar, you might have read it before.  The majority of this article was published 07-04-2013 in the Pipestone County Star. As Stephanie is recovering from knee surgery, she is recycling a few articles for the month of March.  She begs forgiveness.

Winter Weather:  We tend to follow the lead of Pipestone Area Schools.  If the school is closed, we will also be closed.  If the school closes early, we stay open for about a half hour afterwards to make sure all the kids can get picked up.  If the school has a two hour late start, we are not affected and will open at our regular time of 10 AM.

PAFL Update:  Pipestone Area Friends of the Library is looking for members – anyone who is a friend to Meinders Library is welcome to join!  The Friends group works hard to promote the library, raise money for projects, and organize their yearly book sale, in addition to the HUGE amount of support they provide throughout the year.  Call us for the date of the next meeting!

If you have questions or have a book you’d like to reserve or renew, please don’t hesitate to give us a call at (507) 825-6714.  The hours for Meinders Library are Monday through Thursday from 10 AM – 8 PM, and Friday from 10 AM to 5 PM and Saturday from 10AM to Noon.  Summer hours are in effect from Memorial Day weekend until Labor Day Weekend.  Meinders Community Library is located at 1401 7th Street SW, on the south side of the high school.


History of Public Libraries

Pipestone County Star – 03-26-2015

There are many different kinds of libraries: public libraries, research/research libraries, subscription libraries, and medical libraries just to name a few.  So what makes a library a public library?  A public library must be a non-profit organization, supported with public funds and intended for use by the public, hence the name.   The collections are broad and not as specific as most other kinds of libraries, like medical or academic libraries.

The first libraries were probably the collections of Greek and Latin scrolls that were available in the dry sections of the massive baths during the time of the Roman Empire.  These were not lending libraries though, which doesn’t qualify them as public, much like the Great Library of Alexandria, in Egypt.  The Great Library was the first of its kind to go outside of the country for materials and the collection was probably massive, encompassing materials from all over the world, many of which were copied from books and scrolls that came in on trade ships through the Alexandria Harbor.  While they may have loaned materials to the Pharaoh and the Royal Family, they certainly would not have loaned things out to the populace.  The massive European university libraries were impressive with their collections, but only scholars were allowed in.  No chance of getting a library card if you were an ordinary guy off the street.

The first PUBLIC libraries were founded in England in the early 1600s, most of them town libraries.  One library in particular, Chetham’s Library in Manchester, was the largest library to be open freely to the public.  It opened its doors in 1653 and is still open and public today. 

In the United States, there are several towns in the east that claim the title of the first Public Library.  All were founded and opened for public use in the early to mid-1800s.  Many of them began as parish libraries in churches, available to their parishioners and whoever else chose to visit.  The Earl of Ballamont opened a small library in Manhattan around 1700 and that small library would be destined to become the New York Public Library, one of the most esteemed libraries in the country.

Public libraries were appreciated and definitely used, but they didn’t get a big boost in their attendance and recognition until around the turn of the 20th century, when Andrew Carnegie donated over $60 million in order to build nearly 3,000 public libraries (one of which is here in Pipestone).  Libraries have started with wills and benefactors before, but never with the scope that Carnegie managed it.  His vision of libraries was that they would “bring books and information to all peoples.” 

Canada, Mexico, Poland, Italy, and Australia all had their own public libraries develop, around the same time as the libraries in England and the United States.  Since that development, there have been public libraries opened in nearly every country in the world, for the benefit of the population.

NOTE: If this article looks familiar, you might have read it before.  The majority of this article was published 04-15-2010 in the Pipestone County Star. As Stephanie is recovering from knee surgery, she is recycling a few articles for the month of March.  She begs forgiveness.

Winter Weather:  We tend to follow the lead of Pipestone Area Schools.  If the school is closed, we will also be closed.  If the school closes early, we stay open for about a half hour afterwards to make sure all the kids can get picked up.  If the school has a two hour late start, we are not affected and will open at our regular time of 10 AM.


PAFL Update:  Pipestone Area Friends of the Library is looking for members – anyone who is a friend to Meinders Library is welcome to join!  The Friends group works hard to promote the library, raise money for projects, and organize their yearly book sale, in addition to the HUGE amount of support they provide throughout the year.  Call us for the date of the next meeting!


If you have questions or have a book you’d like to reserve or renew, please don’t hesitate to give us a call at (507) 825-6714.  The hours for Meinders Library are Monday through Thursday from 10 AM – 8 PM, and Friday and Saturday from 10 AM – 5 PM.  Meinders Community Library is located at 1401 7th Street SW, on the south side of the high school.

Wednesday, February 4, 2015

Matters of the Heart


Pipestone County Star - 02-12-2015

It’s February, the month that means dozens of roses, boxes and boxes of chocolates, frilly lacy cards, hearts, diamond rings (if you’re lucky) and all sorts of other things that symbolize love and romance.  So what better way to celebrate that to read a little romance for yourself!

There are just the classic sorts of romance novels by authors like Danielle Steel, Lisa Kleypas, and Nora Roberts, but there are also romances that fall in other categories, such as historical, paranormal, Christian, and mystery.  Here are a few other genres to try if you feel the need.

Rule of Scoundrels series, Sarah MacLean – Historical Romance
A Rogue By Any Other Name, One Good Earl Deserves a Lover, No Good Duke Goes Unpunished, and Never Judge a Lady By Her Cover are the four books in this Regency era romance series.  The men and women involved frequently find themselves at a gambling hall in London called The Fallen Angel and they certainly seem to be just that.  The stories are engaging and very saucy, with strong female characters and good plotlines.  A very enjoyable read for the romantically inclined.

Broken Heart series, Michelle Bardsley – Paranormal Romance
I’m the Vampire, That’s Why, Don’t Talk Back to Your Vampire, Because Your Vampire Said So, and Wait Till Your Vampire Gets Home are the first four (of 11) books in the Broken Heart series.  By some crazy quirk of fate, all the single parents in Broken Heart, Oklahoma, have become supernatural creatures.  Not just vampires, but werewolves, half-demons, and other things that go bump in the night (catch my sexy pun there?).  If you enjoy paranormal fiction, this series is for you! Fun characters, crazy situations, and you can’t really go wrong with vampires.

Seasons of the Heart, Jeanette Oke – Christian Romance
Once Upon A Summer, The Winds of Autumn, Winter is Not Forever, and Spring’s Gentle Promise are the four books that make up this series (sometimes found in one volume).  While this could be historical romance since it takes place in the earlier 1900s, the main character also grows in his faith journey throughout the story, which follows him from childhood into adulthood.  Christian romance readers will really love these books and Joshua Jones is a very warm character.

Best Kept Secrets, Sandra Brown – Mystery Romance
Alexandra Gaither’s mother died a scandalous death twenty-five years ago and Alexandra finally has the power to really examine the case and bring those involved to justice.  As Alexandra investigates her mother’s former lover, his best friend, and a father figure to them both, she will find a lot of secrets, some of which she might not want to know.  Plenty of romance as the mystery gets solved, so those who love a good mystery will get what they enjoy along with a healthy dose of attraction.

So keep your heart all warm and happy with a little romance this month – pick up or reserve one of these books today!  Happy Valentine’s Day!

Winter Weather:  We tend to follow the lead of Pipestone Area Schools.  If the school is closed, we will also be closed.  If the school closes early, we stay open for about a half hour afterwards to make sure all the kids can get picked up.  If the school has a two hour late start, we are not affected and will open at our regular time of 10 AM.

PAFL Update:  Pipestone Area Friends of the Library is looking for members – anyone who is a friend to Meinders Library is welcome to join!  The Friends group works hard to promote the library, raise money for projects, and organize their yearly book sale, in addition to the HUGE amount of support they provide throughout the year.  Call us for the date of the next meeting!

If you have questions or have a book you’d like to reserve or renew, please don’t hesitate to give us a call at (507) 825-6714.  The hours for Meinders Library are Monday through Thursday from 10 AM – 8 PM, and Friday and Saturday from 10 AM – 5 PM.  Meinders Community Library is located at 1401 7th Street SW, on the south side of the high school.


Thursday, January 22, 2015

Book Clubs

Pipestone County Star, 01-29-2015

Book clubs are a great way to get to know people.  Everyone reacts differently to every book they read and talking about those books with others brings a level of knowledge that is hard to find in other places.  Unfortunately, the Meinders Library Book Club is no longer active, but there are several book clubs in Pipestone that are still reading.

The library is very interested in starting up a book club again, so if you are interested, please give us a call and let us know.  We would LOVE to have a regular group, probably monthly, to read and discuss together. We don’t need a huge number of people – just a few.  Once the community begins to see how much fun it can be, we’ll grow.

For those of you involved in church or private book clubs already, we have some great resources for you – including Book Club in a Tub if you need some suggestions for what to read.  These kits (listed below) each contain 12 books and a study guide for the club leader and are available on a first come, first serve basis.  They are currently housed at our regional office, but can be delivered within the week and have a 30 day check out period to allow for a full month of reading and the club meeting.  If you are interested in any of the listed titles, please let a librarian know so we can place a hold for you and bring it here!

Currently Available:
Beautiful Music for Ugly Children, Kirsten Cronn-Mills
Frozen, Mary Casanova
The Unbearable Book Club for Unsinkable Girls, Julie Schumacher
A Crooked Number, Nathan Jorgenson
Convergence at Two Harbors, Dennis Herschbach
Poems for Ordinary People, Carol Allis
Cul de Sac, Scott Wrobel
The Wolf at Twilight, Kent Nerburn
The Vanishing, Wendy Webb
Tell My Sons, Lt. Col. Mark M. Weber

Available in June 2015:
Ordinary Grace, William Kent Krueger
Julia Gillian, Alison McGhee
The Round House, Louise Erdich
Rez Life, David Treuer
Abercrombie Trail, Candance Simar
My Life with Deth, David Ellefson
The Lighthouse Road, Peter Geye
The Keeper of Dawn, J.B. Hickman
The Hunger Games, Suzanne Collins
Shadow on the Mountain, Margi Preus
Mayor of the Universe, Lorna Landvik

Hope you have time to read this winter – nothing like a cozy blanket and a good book.  Have a great day!

Winter Weather:  We tend to follow the lead of Pipestone Area Schools.  If the school is closed, we will also be closed.  If the school closes early, we stay open for about a half hour afterwards to make sure all the kids can get picked up.  If the school has a two hour late start, we are not affected and will open at our regular time of 10 AM.


PAFL Update:  Pipestone Area Friends of the Library is looking for members – anyone who is a friend to Meinders Library is welcome to join!  The Friends group works hard to promote the library, raise money for projects, and organize their yearly book sale, in addition to the HUGE amount of support they provide throughout the year.  Call us for the date of the next meeting!

If you have questions or have a book you’d like to reserve or renew, please don’t hesitate to give us a call at (507) 825-6714.  The hours for Meinders Library are Monday through Thursday from 10 AM – 8 PM, and Friday and Saturday from 10 AM – 5 PM.  Meinders Community Library is located at 1401 7th Street SW, on the south side of the high school.